Blogging for Mental Health


KidShop Announcement

We are excited to share that NAMI of Hancock County will be taking registrations for KidShop!  It will be held the 1st Saturday of every month from 10am-2pm Location TBA-----Lunch will be provided. 

 

KidShop is an innovative activity based program for school-age children whose lives have been impacted by mental illness. It was developed by NAMI Minnesota.

NAMI of Hancock County's Executive Director states, "there are several benefits of KidShop: One of the wonderful aspects of KidShop is that it is an extension of support for kids that are already in services. Second, it is an outlet and a support to children that are not in services and will help them understand mental health conditions and find support among their peers. Lastly, parents that are struggling from a mental health condition or have a child with a mental health condition sometimes need a break to re-group so they can be their best self." 

But, what is KidShop?

“Why do they act that way? It’s not fair! It’s embarrassing!“

These complaints are often voiced by kids who have a parent or sibling with a mental illness. KidShop provides a fun experience where kids join in activities, share concerns, get support, and learn they are not alone.

  • KidShop is for children in 1st to 12th grade. Participants are organized into two groups:
    • Children who do not have a mental health diagnosis themselves but have a sibling or parent with a diagnosis.
    • Children with a mental health diagnosis.

Pre-registration and interview is required, so that parent(s) and child(ren) have an opportunity to meet staff prior to program entry. It also provides an opportunity to address and needs your child(ren) may have so that NAMI can provide them with a great learning and social experience. Online registration can be found under the education tab on the NAMI of Hancock County website or by clicking here.

4 Comments

Getting Past Holiday Stress

The holiday season often brings on an abundance of demands from attending parties, to shopping, to cleaning and entertaining, and bringing together families and all their uniqueness. All these holiday demands can certainly  provide us with additional stress! 

 

You are not alone... 

 

Here are some tips to help you recognize and manage stress through the holiday season.

How Stress Affects You: 

 

Stress affects your entire body, mentally as well as physically. Some common signs include:

  • Headaches
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Jaw pain
  • Changes in appetite
  • Frequent mood swings
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Feeling overwhelmed

Ways to Reduce Stress:

  • Accept your needs. Recognize what your triggers are. What situations make you feel physically and mentally agitated? Once you know this, you can avoid them when it's reasonable to, and to cope when you can't.
  • Manage your time. Prioritizing your activities can help you use your time well. Making a day-to-day schedule helps ensure you don't feel overwhelmed by everyday tasks and deadlines.
  • Be realistic. The holidays don't have to be perfect or just like last year. As families change and grow, traditions and rituals often change as well. Choose a few to hold on to, and be open to creating new ones. Try to accept family members and friends as they are, even if they don't live up to all of your expectations. Be understanding if others get upset or distressed when something goes awry. Chances are they're feeling the effects of holiday stress and depression, too.
  • Practice relaxation. Deep breathing, meditation and progressive muscle relaxation are good ways to calm yourself. Taking a break to refocus can have benefits beyond the immediate moment.
  • Exercise daily. Schedule time to walk outside, bike or join a dance class. Whatever you do, make sure it's fun. Daily exercise naturally produces stress-relieving hormones in your body and improves your overall physical health.
  • Set aside time for yourself. Schedule something that makes you feel good. It might be reading a book, go to the movies, get a massage or take your dog for a walk.
  • Eat well. Eating unprocessed foods, like whole grains, vegetables, and fresh fruit is the foundation for a healthy body and mind. Eating well can also help stabilize your mood.
  • Get enough sleep. Symptoms of some mental health conditions, like mania in bipolar disorder, can be triggered by getting too little sleep.
  • Avoid alcohol and drugs. They don't actually reduce stress: in fact, they often worsen it. If you're struggling with substance abuse, educate yourself and get help.
  • Talk to someone. Whether to friends, family, a counselor or a support group, airing out and talking can help. Consider attending a NAMI Support Group.

Getting Help

 

If the steps you've taken aren't working, it may be time to share with your mental health professional. He or she can help you pinpoint specific events that trigger you and help you create an action plan to change them.

1 Comments

2016 Program Schedule

Registration is required for all educational programming due to limited seating available.

The is no registration needed for support group.

*All programs are subject to change date or location.

Blogging for Mental Health

You asked and we have made this blog page available! Are you new to blogging and asking what will that do for me? Well there is a long standing history that writing helps in the recovery process. Additionally blogging allows us to begin a conversation with our peers and receive peer feedback.


Do you need to get something off your chest? Have you found something helpful in your recovery journey? Looking for peer advice or support on a given topic? What's your story? 


OK so now that you have something in mind now what? Send your blog to executivedirector@namiofhancock.org. Make sure you include your first name that will be posted with your blog. Then viola! Once your post is approved it will be up in 24 hours for peers to weigh in on the topic. 


Of course we are not done yet! There must be a disclosure statement! 

*The opinions and views expressed are not necessarily the opinions or views of NAMI of Hancock County. The articles are solely the views and opinions of the contributors, which are our members, peers and family members. Please note that the comments are not regularly monitored by NAMI Staff. We ask that you please be kind and respect others' thoughts and opinions. 


*If you are having thoughts of suicide or harm to another please call 911 or the crisis line at

1-888-936-7116.

18 Comments

KidShop Announcement

We are excited to share that NAMI of Hancock County will be taking registrations for KidShop!  It will be held the 1st Saturday of every month from 10am-2pm Location TBA-----Lunch will be provided. 

 

KidShop is an innovative activity based program for school-age children whose lives have been impacted by mental illness. It was developed by NAMI Minnesota.

NAMI of Hancock County's Executive Director states, "there are several benefits of KidShop: One of the wonderful aspects of KidShop is that it is an extension of support for kids that are already in services. Second, it is an outlet and a support to children that are not in services and will help them understand mental health conditions and find support among their peers. Lastly, parents that are struggling from a mental health condition or have a child with a mental health condition sometimes need a break to re-group so they can be their best self." 

But, what is KidShop?

“Why do they act that way? It’s not fair! It’s embarrassing!“

These complaints are often voiced by kids who have a parent or sibling with a mental illness. KidShop provides a fun experience where kids join in activities, share concerns, get support, and learn they are not alone.

  • KidShop is for children in 1st to 12th grade. Participants are organized into two groups:
    • Children who do not have a mental health diagnosis themselves but have a sibling or parent with a diagnosis.
    • Children with a mental health diagnosis.

Pre-registration and interview is required, so that parent(s) and child(ren) have an opportunity to meet staff prior to program entry. It also provides an opportunity to address and needs your child(ren) may have so that NAMI can provide them with a great learning and social experience. Online registration can be found under the education tab on the NAMI of Hancock County website or by clicking here.

4 Comments

Getting Past Holiday Stress

The holiday season often brings on an abundance of demands from attending parties, to shopping, to cleaning and entertaining, and bringing together families and all their uniqueness. All these holiday demands can certainly  provide us with additional stress! 

 

You are not alone... 

 

Here are some tips to help you recognize and manage stress through the holiday season.

How Stress Affects You: 

 

Stress affects your entire body, mentally as well as physically. Some common signs include:

  • Headaches
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Jaw pain
  • Changes in appetite
  • Frequent mood swings
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Feeling overwhelmed

Ways to Reduce Stress:

  • Accept your needs. Recognize what your triggers are. What situations make you feel physically and mentally agitated? Once you know this, you can avoid them when it's reasonable to, and to cope when you can't.
  • Manage your time. Prioritizing your activities can help you use your time well. Making a day-to-day schedule helps ensure you don't feel overwhelmed by everyday tasks and deadlines.
  • Be realistic. The holidays don't have to be perfect or just like last year. As families change and grow, traditions and rituals often change as well. Choose a few to hold on to, and be open to creating new ones. Try to accept family members and friends as they are, even if they don't live up to all of your expectations. Be understanding if others get upset or distressed when something goes awry. Chances are they're feeling the effects of holiday stress and depression, too.
  • Practice relaxation. Deep breathing, meditation and progressive muscle relaxation are good ways to calm yourself. Taking a break to refocus can have benefits beyond the immediate moment.
  • Exercise daily. Schedule time to walk outside, bike or join a dance class. Whatever you do, make sure it's fun. Daily exercise naturally produces stress-relieving hormones in your body and improves your overall physical health.
  • Set aside time for yourself. Schedule something that makes you feel good. It might be reading a book, go to the movies, get a massage or take your dog for a walk.
  • Eat well. Eating unprocessed foods, like whole grains, vegetables, and fresh fruit is the foundation for a healthy body and mind. Eating well can also help stabilize your mood.
  • Get enough sleep. Symptoms of some mental health conditions, like mania in bipolar disorder, can be triggered by getting too little sleep.
  • Avoid alcohol and drugs. They don't actually reduce stress: in fact, they often worsen it. If you're struggling with substance abuse, educate yourself and get help.
  • Talk to someone. Whether to friends, family, a counselor or a support group, airing out and talking can help. Consider attending a NAMI Support Group.

Getting Help

 

If the steps you've taken aren't working, it may be time to share with your mental health professional. He or she can help you pinpoint specific events that trigger you and help you create an action plan to change them.

1 Comments

2016 Program Schedule

Registration is required for all educational programming due to limited seating available.

The is no registration needed for support group.

*All programs are subject to change date or location.

Blogging for Mental Health

You asked and we have made this blog page available! Are you new to blogging and asking what will that do for me? Well there is a long standing history that writing helps in the recovery process. Additionally blogging allows us to begin a conversation with our peers and receive peer feedback.


Do you need to get something off your chest? Have you found something helpful in your recovery journey? Looking for peer advice or support on a given topic? What's your story? 


OK so now that you have something in mind now what? Send your blog to executivedirector@namiofhancock.org. Make sure you include your first name that will be posted with your blog. Then viola! Once your post is approved it will be up in 24 hours for peers to weigh in on the topic. 


Of course we are not done yet! There must be a disclosure statement! 

*The opinions and views expressed are not necessarily the opinions or views of NAMI of Hancock County. The articles are solely the views and opinions of the contributors, which are our members, peers and family members. Please note that the comments are not regularly monitored by NAMI Staff. We ask that you please be kind and respect others' thoughts and opinions. 


*If you are having thoughts of suicide or harm to another please call 911 or the crisis line at

1-888-936-7116.

18 Comments